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3D Digital Apparel

Under the Influence: 3D Imagery and Online Shopping

Marketers and academicians slice, dice, and categorize us into countless niches. A fertile topic for their research has long been how we shop, and more so now with e-commerce’s unrelenting growth.

Much studied regarding e-commerce is the influence of website imagery in promoting products. As early as 2002, researchers found that using 3D images triggers mental imagery that enhances the virtual shopping experience. A 2013 study we wrote about found that adding interactivity to 3D product images, such as 360-degree rotation, significantly increases purchase intention.

A new study published in November in the Journal of Business Research examined two niches of shoppers: those who have a high need to touch products before buying them online and those who don’t. Specifically, the two researchers wanted to know how viewing vivid 3D vs 2D product images would influence the two groups. They also wanted to know whether the effects would vary based on the type of product featured.

Long Road to Make Virtual Apparel Look Real

The staggering but steady leaps in computing power make possible Embodee’s virtual product experiences, as they do countless other things. Without several decades of exponential advances, our servers would take intolerably long to dynamically render images of apparel. And your web-enabled devices would take even longer to display them.

For example, our recently patented virtual try-on technology produces in seconds a 360-degree view of how a pair of jeans fit you. In the past it would have taken minutes or even hours, an experience like trying on those jeans in a dressing room but endlessly waiting to see anything in the mirror.

One Product, Countless Views

Sometimes it’s challenging to comprehend innovations that far outpace their once-innovative forerunners.

Consider the introduction of motion pictures in the late 1800s, Polaroid photography in the 1940s, and digital photography in the 1970s. They weren’t incremental advances in technology. They were leaps forward.

Those advances come to mind now thanks to an anecdote and unrelated calculation about Embodee’s unique visualization technology.

Solving Apparel Industry's Image Problem

Online apparel sales have an image problem. Image as in how websites display garments, footwear, and accessories to entice shoppers to buy. Notable exceptions aside, most product photographs don’t narrow The Sensorial Chasm: the difference between touching and closely inspecting a garment vs experiencing it virtually on a screen.

Images online typically are small, two dimensional, and lack detail. Zoom features aren’t the norm. Another drawback: scarcity. Most sites show an individual item from only one or a few angles. At a brick-and-mortar store you don’t pick up a tennis shoe and only look at one side and the sole—you turn it every which way.

Interactive Customization Goes Brick and Mortar

Stroll into Foot Locker’s store in New York’s Times Square and you can’t miss the bright red kiosk. Built around large interactive video screens, the kiosk invites shoppers to customize and then buy an iconic running shoe, the New Balance 574, before their personalized design is manufactured.

Via the touch screens, a potential buyer can choose from myriad color choices for various shoe components, different materials, and add text such as a name. A design can be zoomed in for an up-close inspection and turned 360 degrees before ordering. The kiosk includes physical samples of the shoes’ various parts, from thread and laces to leather and mesh swatches.

Embodee Adds Footwear to Its 3D Visualization System

New York City (PRWEB) — Embodee Corp. today announced the development of a unique process to create vivid online 3D images of footwear and apparel accessories such as handbags, gloves, and hats. The development represents a significant extension of its garment digitization system.

The virtual products can be viewed from any angle and smoothly rotated, replicating a 360-degree video inspection. Another benefit: the products can be interactively revised with multiple design options if brands want to offer customers the ability to customize or personalize based on individual aesthetic tastes.

Embodee: All in a Name

We’re vexed that our company name is occasionally mispronounced. Not to get all schoolmarmish here, but Embodee is pronounced the same as em-BOD-y, not em-BODE-ee. Merriam-Webster says it aloud for easy aural reference.

Perhaps the mispronunciations are the price of using a branding practice popular among tech firms. The practice: intentionally misspelling a word to make it more memorable, and in cases such as Embodee, also using a word that describes an aspect of what they do.

Patents, Tech Innovation, and Credibility

We announced a milestone this week in a news release: Embodee's process for creating and modeling 3D digital images of apparel has been awarded a U.S. government patent. Here’s an excerpt:

"Many previous patented innovations in garment digitization focused on providing more cost-effective development and manufacturing of garments from raw materials. Embodee’s invention enables the reverse: taking existing garments from the real world and creating cost-effective yet vivid digital reproductions in any number of variations from just a single sample."